More Information for Healthcare Providers–Coming Soon!

 Coming Soon

  • An Introduction to AGS for Physicians
  • AGS for Primary Care Physicians by Scott Commins, MD, PhD
  • AGS for Allergists by Scott Commins, MD
  • AGS for Pediatricians
  • AGS for Anesthesiologists
  • AGS for Gastroenterologists
  • AGS for Dermatologists
  • AGS for First Responders
  • AGS for Dentists
  • AGS for Pharmacists
  • AGS for Outpatient Surgical Units and Hospitals
    • Pre-surgical intake
      • The importance of charting correctly
      • Coding
      • Alerts for anesthesiology, pharmacy, dietary manager, nursing administrator, surgical unit (pre-op and post-op)
    • Pre-op charting
      • Patient’s responsibility to make sure AG is correctly notated and alerts have been sent
      • Nursing staff responsibility to ensure AG compliance throughout stay
      • Nursing staff checklist (regarding the following):
    • Medications
      • Both administered in hospital/clinic and prescribed
      • Resources available for patients
      • Resources available for nurses, doctors, techs, kitchen, anesthesiology, etc.
    • Topicals
      • Ingredients to watch out for
      • Alternatives to commonly used topicals
    • Bandages, tapes, etc.
      • Ingredients to watch for
      • Alternatives to commonly used bandages, etc.
    • Anesthesia
      • Implications/resources for anesthesiology
      • Who/where to call if you have questions
    • Pharmacy
      • Communication in advance
      • Resources available for pharmacists, nurses, and doctors
      • Proper notation throughout stay (sign off on all meds)
      • Who/where to call if you have questions
    • Post-op
      • Proper notation on file for medications, topicals, bandages, etc.
      • Allowing family member/advocate to be with patient following procedure until conscious (to monitor and make decisions they are not able to make)
    • Dietary restrictions/kitchen communication
      • Educational resources available to kitchen staff prior to visit
      • Checklist be made available (including ingredients, condiments, cooking oils, shared utensils and pans, etc.)
      • Educational materials regarding fumes (from foods, chemicals, etc.)
      • Olfactory implications – fume reactions
      • Not only relevant in regards to foods
  • Resources for Physicians
    • Implications for Pharmacists document
    • Medication ”No-No” list (to include medications, medication ingredients, fillers, etc.)
    • List of safe alternatives to some typical medications, topicals, bandages, etc.
    • Spotting reactions: what to watch for before, during, and after surgery / procedures
    • How to respond to reactions during care / procedures
  • Our Voices:  Patients’ Healthcare Stories